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Jeffrey G. Davis is a partner in the Tax Transactions & Consulting group in Mayer Brown’s Washington DC office and is a co-head of the firm’s Renewable Energy group. Jeff represents major corporations, financial institutions and private equity funds on a wide range of US federal income tax matters. His practice focuses on partnership tax, tax credits and other incentives, and project finance and development. 

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On July 1, 2021, the US Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) released Revenue Ruling 2021-13 (the “Ruling”), which provides additional guidance on the definition of “carbon capture equipment” for purposes of the carbon capture tax credit under Section 45Q of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). The Ruling also clarifies that

Over the past number of weeks, a variety of legislative proposals, from both sides of the aisle, have been released that, if enacted, could drastically impact the US energy industry and, in many cases, the taxation of energy in the United States. These proposals come on the heels of the Biden administration’s American Jobs Plan

On March 31, 2021, the Biden administration released the American Jobs Plan (the “Infrastructure Plan”), which is a proposal that, if ultimately enacted, aims to modernize outdated infrastructure, create additional jobs and increase the United States’ global competitiveness. Alongside the Infrastructure Plan, the Biden administration released a Made in America Tax Plan (the “Tax Plan”),

On January 6, 2021, the US Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) issued final regulations (T.D. 9944) (the “Final Regulations”) on the Section 45Q carbon capture tax credit (the “Carbon Credit”). The Final Regulations implement numerous provisions of the proposed regulations (REG-112339-19) (the “Proposed Regulations”) that were issued last year but contain certain investor-friendly changes and

On Monday, December 21, 2020, the United States Congress passed a second large stimulus bill[1] (the “Relief Bill”) aimed at curtailing the economic disruptions caused by COVID-19. The Relief Bill, among other things, extends renewable energy tax credits for wind projects, solar projects and carbon capture and sequestration and contains specific provisions addressing offshore

Last night, US Congressional leaders announced an agreement on a $900 billion COVID relief bill. While the text of the bill has not been released as of this writing, people familiar with the negotiations have indicated that the deal will extend renewable energy tax credits for wind and solar projects and the Section 45Q carbon