The UK Supreme Court has handed down its judgment in the case of Okpabi and others v Royal Dutch Shell Plc and another.  This is an important decision that will be of interest to all UK headquartered companies operating in jurisdictions and industries where there is a higher risk of ESG-related issues arising.  Although the

The UK has announced an ambitious target to achieve a net zero carbon economy by 2050. It is widely acknowledged both within the UK government and industry more broadly that hydrogen will play a key role in achieving this target. The potential role of hydrogen in the transport and heating sector is seen as particularly

On 11 November 2020, the UK government published draft legislation, the National Security and Investment Bill (the “Bill”), which will significantly change the treatment of mergers and acquisitions in the United Kingdom and will introduce a new security screening regime separate from competition law. 

Once in force, it will require prior notification and approval of

“Our seas hold immense potential to power our homes and communities with low-cost green energy”.

On 6 October 2020 the British Prime Minister announced a plan to allocate £160m towards the upgrade of ports and infrastructure in the UK with a view to the UK becoming a leader in clean wind energy. Further targets of

On 12 October 2020, the English High Court handed down judgment in respect of various preliminary issues in the case of Travelport Limited and others v WEX Inc. The dispute concerns the issue of whether or not the occurrence of the global COVID-19 pandemic engaged the material adverse effect (“MAE”) provisions in an SPA in

Last week’s UK-EU summit in Brussels had been billed as “crunch time” for a future trade agreement to be reached between the UK and EU in time for any deal to be ratified before the end of the transition period, which expires on 31 December 2020.

There are many consequences of no agreement being reached. One consequence of legal significance is that court proceedings commenced after 31 December 2020 will no longer benefit from EU rules providing for the reciprocal enforcement of judgments, and a streamlined process for enforcement, pursuant to the so-called Recast Brussels Regulation 1215/2012 on jurisdiction and the recognition and enforcement of judgments in civil and commercial matters (the “Regulation“). This is important because without the Regulation, enforcing UK judgments in EU jurisdictions, and vice versa, is likely to be a more cumbersome and uncertain process, and therefore more time-consuming and expensive.


Continue Reading No-deal Brexit – Enforcement of judgments in the UK or EU member states